“Feathered Friends” Links and Resources

We also have a recorded webinar around “Feathered Friends” and feeding birds.

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– Book of the Month – Click to get it on Amazon.

Introductory Lesson

Answers and explanations to True or False activity:
Basic Statements:

  1. True – All birds have feathers. Some birds have highly modified feathers to fit particular functions, such as the fancy feathers on a peacock’s tail.
  2. False – While birds are known for their ability to fly, there are many that do not fly such as penguins (who swim), ostriches, emus, and kiwis.
  3. True – All birds have two wings!
  4. True – Birds can replace old and damaged feathers through molting. Molting generally occurs after nesting or before migration when the bird has the resources and energy.
  5. False – If this were the case, birds would be too heavy to fly! Instead, birds have adapted to have very light but strong bones.
  6. False – Birds generally have very good sight.  Many birds can see color and some can even see light ranging in the ultraviolet spectrum, which humans cannot see!
  7. False – The heartbeat of birds are faster than  humans.
  8. True – All birds do lay eggs.
  9. False – There is a large variety of diets among birds.  Birds eat anything from seeds, nectar, insects, worms, fish, crustaceans, frogs, and small animals.
  10. False – While not all birds sing the beautiful songs we commonly think of, most are capable of making a variety of sounds whether they be calls, chip notes, or the sound of pecking against a tree. In many songbirds, males do more singing.

Challenging Statements

  1. False – All birds do not migrate; for example, the Northern Cardinal is one species which remains in one area all year round. Many birds, especially those that eat insects – must migrate to find food.
  2. True – Birds are vertebrate animals that have a backbone and internal skeleton just like you!
  3. True – All birds are warm-blooded, or endothermic. This means that birds are able to regulate their body temperature through various internal means.
  4. False – Not all baby birds are covered in downy feathers when they hatch. For example, many song birds, such as the Blue Jay, are born virtually naked.
  5. True – There are many species where the male and female species look different. Examples of these species are the Northern Cardinal, where the male is bright red and the female simply a redish brown, the Amercan Goldfinch, and the Red-winged Blackbird.

Meet Three Feeder Birds:

Visit All About Birds to find out more about the three feeder birds you learned about in the lesson.  Find the species of chickadee near you and check out the Mourning Dove and Downy Woodpecker!

Photos by

Photos by Evaristo Hernandez-Fernandez and the Downy Woodpecker by Larry McQueen

 Western Version

In addition the the chickadee and Mourning Dove, check out the Nuttall’s Woodpecker and Acorn Woodpecker!
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     – Book of the Month –   Click to get it on Amazon.

What’s in a Habitat – October

Bird of the Month

 

American Goldfinch

American Goldfinch

 

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Taking Flight: Flying and Migration  November

     – Book of the Month –   Click to get it on Amazon.

Click here to find out all about migration. 

Birds of the Month: 

Steller's Jay

Steller’s Jay

Blue Jay

Blue Jay

Western Scrub Jay (Photo by Bill Gracey)

Western Scrub Jay (Photo by Bill Gracey)

Western Version

Here is a list of birds that do not migrate:

  • Western Scrub Jay
  • Chestnut-backed Chickadee
  • Oak Titmouse
  • Dark-eyed Junco
  • Acorn Woodpecker

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     – Book of the Month –   Click to get it on Amazon.

Move Like a Bird! – December

 

Recommended video clips to observe different bird movements:
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/physics/lessons/elementary/adaptations

 

Bird of the Month: 

American Crow on All About Birds

American Crow

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Eat Like a Bird! – January

Beaks! by Sneed B. Collard III

     – Book of the Month –   Click to get it on Amazon.

Bird of the Month: 

Dark-eyed Junco

Dark-eyed Junco

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If you can count, you can help a scientist! – February

The Boy Who Drew Birds by Jacqueline Davies

     – Book of the Month –   Click to get it on Amazon.

In this month’s activity you are prepped and primed to count birds and join thousands of other citizen scientists for the Great Backyard Bird Count.
The GBBC
In preparation for the GBBC, find your regional birds checklist (tally sheet)
Birds of the Month: 
The Purple Finch and House Finch can be tricky to distinguish from one another upon first sight.  Take a little time to explore their traits and you’ll be an expert in no time.
  1. How would you describe their differences and similarities?
  2. Click on their images here to listen to their calls on All About Birds.  How do their vocalizations compare and contrast?
Purple Finch

Purple Finch

House Finch

House Finch

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Who’s that… up in the sky? – March

AmazingBirds_AlexandraParsons

     – Book of the Month –   Click to get it on Amazon.

Ready to dive further into bird identification?

Download and print out the mini feeder bird poster from Project FeederWatch.

 

Download the “Bird Silhouettes” mini poster from Celebrate Urban Birds.

 

Consider purchasing the BirdSleuth: Most Wanted Birds kit.

 

Make sure you register with eBird so you can share your student’s bird counts!

Bird of the Month

House Sparrow

House Sparrow

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Do you hear what I hear? – April

Birdsong by Audrey Wood

     – Book of the Month –   Click to get it on Amazon.

Click here to find the book of the week on Amazon.

Before starting the activity, access and test out the bird sounds you will be using. 

 

Stumped with the Bird Song Matching activity? Here are the answers:

Black Capped Chickadee – “Chicka-dee-dee-dee”

American Crow – “Caw, caw, caw”

Mourning Dove – “Hoo-oo, hoo-hoo-hoo”

American Robin – “cheer-up, cheerily, cheerily…”

Northern Cardinal – “Wha-cheer, wha-cheer”

Blue Jay – “Jay, jay”

American Goldfinch – “Potato-chip, potato-chip”

Red-winged Blackbird – “o-ka-lee, o-la-lee”

Western Version

TAKE HOME ACTIVITY

Parents and Guardians – Your child has learned about wild birds in school, and this sheet is designed to offer more information and activities for your family to enjoy wild birds.

DO YOU HEAR WHAT I HEAR?

Bird Sound Matching

Go out in the morning and listen to the dawn chorus or bird songs.  Open your ears and maybe even close your eyes to pinpoint animal sounds.  Write down what you hear.  If you’re up for a challenge, try to identify birds based on some of the sounds learned in class.

Match these birds to what they say below:

BIRD SPECIES                                                                    SOUNDS LIKE

Chestnut-backed Chickadee                                                   “hoo-oo, hoo-hoo-hoo”

American Crow                                                                       “tseek-a-dee-dee”

Mourning Dove                                                                       “cheer-up, cheer-up”

American Robin                                                                      “caw, caw, caw”

Oak Titmouse                                                                          “tjiboo, tjiboo, ….”

Western Scrub Jay                                                                  “o-ka-lee, o-ka-lee”

Lesser Goldfinch                                                                    “shreep, shreep,”

Red-winged Blackbird                                                           “tee-yee, tee-yee”

Listen to their calls at www.allaboutbirds.org.  Some birds may have more than one sound.

Bird of the Month

Red-tailed Hawk

Red-tailed Hawk

 

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Nests and Chicks! – May

Birds Build Nests by Yvonne Winer

     – Book of the Month –   Click to get it on Amazon.

 

Heron Cam at Sapsucker Woods

Hawk Cam on Cornell University Campus

Bird of the Month
American Robin

American Robin

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Hooked on BirdSleuth activities? Make sure you check out our other kits and resources. 
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Keep reading in your classroom.

Our other book recommendations are:

Flute’s Journey: The Life of a Wood Thrush – by Lynne Cherry

 


When Agnes Caws – by Candace Fleming