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Submitted By

M.T. Roche

Lincroft, Middletown, NJ, United States

Description

High Technology High School uses a flexible schedule to allow for many interactions among freshman students and faculty members who teach Biology, Applications of Software and Humanities (BASH).

During this current academic year, the freshman biology and English teachers have planned and conducted monthly field studies that are allowing students to visit square meter plots of land that they “adopted” in September. The idea came from Dr. David Haskell’s award winning book, The Forest Unseen, that includes numerous essays inspired by his year of observations of one square meter in an eastern deciduous forest.

We welcome the opportunity to allow our students to share their experiences and to hopefully encourage them to act on some of the initiatives inspired by their outdoor studies and observations.

 

Students and faculty have been observing daily nest activities of mourning doves in our school courtyard.

Students and faculty have been observing daily nest activities of mourning doves in our school courtyard.

An inexpensive, weatherproof, IR, camera was interfaced to a closed circuit monitor in the science hallway of our building.  Many requests to upgrade equipment to allow for web access.

An inexpensive, weatherproof, IR, camera was interfaced to a closed circuit monitor in the science hallway of our building. Many requests to upgrade equipment to allow for web access.

BASH (Biology, Applications of Software, Humanities)

Last October, after reading a profile of biologist and author David Haskell in The New York Times, our students were inspired by his dedication to biology and writing. They sought out Dr. Haskell on Twitter, asking him about his career as a biologist and as a writer. He was immensely responsive and the chat led to a Skype session. Dr. Haskell inspired the students to look around our campus and spend time observing the nature in our backyard. This year, our classes are reading Dr. Haskell's book, The Forest Unseen, and observing their own mandalas. We have participated in citizen science projects, eco-art, and science writing while learning about the habitats that make up our campus. Because we share a campus with our local community college we hope to inspire others, too.

Our community building team currently involves three faculty members and three student leaders from the HTHS class of 2017. The student leaders are organizing brainstorming sessions with students from their class on specific ideas for improving campus habitats, getting involved with eBird and other citizen science initiatives and suggestions for incorporating more field studies into existing curriculum and independent student research projects.

Our goals for the remainder of this academic year involve seasonal maintenance and restoration of three student constructed rain gardens, a field session with Monmouth County master gardeners, improving habitat for Monarch butterflies on campus, a Skype session with Dr. David Haskell, and welcoming the incoming class of 2018 with strategies for how they might carry on the work started by this freshman class.

We welcome the opportunity to allow our students to share their experiences and to hopefully encourage them to act on some of the initiatives inspired by their outdoor studies and observations during our monthly "FUn (Forest Unseen) days." More to follow…

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